Oregon "Dead Zone" (More Bad News About the Ocean)

| Sat Aug. 5, 2006 11:39 PM EDT

For the fifth straight year, a dead zone, now the size of Rhode Island, has appeared off the coast of Oregon. As Julia Whitty reported in Mother Jones' special report on the fate of the ocean,

"Dead zones occur wherever oceanic oxygen is depleted below the level necessary to sustain marine life, a result of eutrophication, or the release of excess nutrients into the sea, usually from agricultural fertilizers….For sea life, it's as if all the air were suddenly sucked out of the world. Those creatures that can swim or walk away fast enough may survive. Those that can't, die."

And dead zones are further exacerbated by global warming. As the New York Times reports on the Oregon dead zone:

Jane Lubchenco, a marine biologist at Oregon State University, said the phenomenon did not appear to be linked to recurring El Niño or La Niña currents or to long-term cycles of ocean movements. That made Dr. Lubchenco wonder if climate change might be a factor, she said, adding, "There is no other cause, as far as we can determine."

More on the state of dead zones, after the jump:

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