Too Big to Jail?

Big Finance's 10 Favorite Lawmakers (for Now)

Here's how to reap Wall Street's largesse on Capitol Hill: Represent New York, sit on a financial committee, hold a leadership position—or, if you're Chuck Schumer, trifecta!

LEGISLATOR

DONATIONS FROM
BIG FINANCE, 2009

WHY WALL STREET WANTS
HIS/HER ATTENTION

Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.)

$1,735,900

The Street's favorite Dem fought regs for derivatives, credit ratings, and accounting

Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.)

$1,019,110

As majority leader, signed off on TARP; all finance-related bills need his approval

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.)

$944,950

Junior senator voted against the bailout twice—perhaps she'll come around

Sen. Chris Dodd (D-Conn.)

$745,698

Once a deregulation fan, he's now facing a reeelction fight—and pushing for reforms

Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.)

$499,197

Minority whip's October '09 (!) op-ed said Americans underappreciate derivatives

Sen. Michael Bennet (D-Colo.)

$458,008

Used to retool bankrupt companies for conservative billionaire Philip Anschutz

Rep. Jim Himes (D-Conn.)

$423,873

Ex-VP at Goldman Sachs, member of pro-business New Democrat Coalition

Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.)

$409,300

As ag committee chair, she must sign off on any new derivative regulations

Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.)

$382,349

Financial Services Committee chair has called for "death panels" for failing firms

Rep. Melissa Bean (D-Ill.)

$364,875

Tried to weaken consumer protection bill, voted against taxing giant AIG bonuses

Source: Center for Responsive Politics (donations as of 10/25/09)

This chart is part of Mother Jones' coverage of the financial crisis, one year later.