January/February 2005

A Gathering Swarm

It wasn’t quite enough on November 2—but the movement that rose to challenge George W. Bush may yet portend a historic turnaround for the left.

The Party That Never Ends

The Democrats were once a strong, grassroots “people’s party”—and as Republicans well know, that’s what it takes to win elections.

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FEATURES

The Condemned

Intended to enable government to tear down homes for public projects, eminent domain laws are instead being used to clear space for box stores and office parks. In Ohio, threatened homeowners are fighting back.

A Touch of Crude

How Teodoro Obiang’s brutal West African kleptocracy became a darling of American bankers, oil companies, and the administration of George W. Bush.

Coming Home

Seven families lay their fallen soldiers to rest.





Dozens of Words for Snow, None for Pollution

The industrialized world is contaminating Arctic wildlife, which puts the Inuit in a terrible dilemma: ingest poison, or abandon their hunting culture.

Life on the Inside

It seems like a social conservative’s worst nightmare: free apartments for the homeless, no requirements for sobriety or other strings attached. But the Pathways program has worked so well, even the Bush administration is getting behind it.

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DEPARTMENTS

Editor's Note
Masthead
Contributors
Backtalk


Licensed to bill; Small-tent, big-closet politics; “Don’t test, don’t tell” at the Pentagon; Rats rule the EPAWhat’s Arabic for toupee?; Big Pharma targets the weary well; A pill full of sugar; plus our peer-to-peer Hellraisers


For Richer or Poorer
Whose wedding is it, anyway?

NOTEBOOK
Little Big Companies

The number of no-bid federal contracts for Alaskan tribal companies is soaring. Good news for their corporate partners—like Halliburton.


Exiles of the Kalahari

They were exiled from their homeland in the name of progress. Is the Kalahari big enough for the Bushmen and the diamond industry?

EXPOSURE
From Rubble to Republic

Afghans cast a vote for hope.


Matthew Brzezinski surveils the “security-industrial complex” in his review of No Place to Hide; The grunge politics of Nirvana’s Krist Novoselic; plus more book, music, and film reviews


Resources for getting involved


The Bay of Indifference
Cartoon by Peter Hoey