VIDEO: A Hitchhiker’s Guide to New York City

Following Hurricane Sandy, New Yorkers offer rides to strangers in order to cross bridges.

Three days after Hurricane Sandy pounded New York City, traffic was starting to flow again over the bridges, but with a catch: Beginning Thursday, cars would only be allowed to cross into Manhattan if they had three or more people. That came as a surprise to many residents of Brooklyn and Long Island seeking to escape the outer boroughs. But soon, informal car pools had sprung up, with drivers picking up pedestrians at at the bridge entrance in order to meet the quota. “The same thing happened during 9/11,” one police officer on the scene told me.

UPDATE: Mayor Bloomberg will lift the three-person minimum restriction on cars entering Manhattan starting at 5:00 p.m. today.

Correction: Officer Schwartz’s name was misspelled in an earlier version of this video. 

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THE BIG PICTURE

You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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