More on McCain and Romney, the Amazing Pandering Duo

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Yesterday when I blogged about Mitt Romney following John McCain’s lead on the speak-at-universities-run-by-right-wing-zealots front, I couldn’t have known that Howard Fineman of Newsweek would be thinking along the same lines.

 fineman_serious.jpg Well, he is. In a “WEB-EXCLUSIVE COMMENTARY” on Newsweek.com (for the record, everything I write in this space is a WEB-EXCLUSIVE COMMENTARY) Fineman says that the three “kingmakers” of the right are Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell, and James Dobson. Writes the very serious gentleman at right, “There are two main fault lines among them: the one in Virginia, which separates Falwell and Robertson; and the one that separates Dobson, in his mountain fastness of Colorado Springs, from those he genially regards as amateurs (everybody else).”

That means that after Papa McCain cozied up to Falwell and the good reverend made McCain his choice for the Repbulican nomination, Robertson had to go looking for another candidate to endorse (and influence, obviously). And that’s why we have news that Romney will be delivering the next commencement address at Robertson’s Regent University; the man who once said that George Bush would win in 2004 because the Lord had told him so has selected the First Mormon as his cause.

That leaves Dobson. He’s already said “I would not vote for John McCain under any circumstances” and, according to Fineman, has said the same about Giuliani. Fineman says that leaves Mike Huckabee, “the personable former Arkansas governor who also spent a good bit of his career as a Southern Baptist preacher.”

I can just see the campaign slogans now. “Huckabee ’08: Jesus Was a Dark Horse, Too!”

Wait, isn’t that a country song?

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THE BIG PICTURE

You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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