Music News: Winehouse Sings Via Satellite, Neil Young Gives Up, Timbaland’s On the Phone, Beck Admits to Nonsense


News - Feb 8

  • Amy Winehouse, denied a visa to come to the States for the Grammys on Sunday, will appear on the broadcast via satellite from London. Winehouse actually used the phrase “raring to go” in a statement.

  • Neil Young either got up on the wrong side of the bed, or has given up all hope for the future of mankind. Introducing a film in Berlin on Friday, he told the audience that “the time when music could change the world is past.” Some of us are so cynical we’d make a joke about that time not existing ever, but we got up on the wrong side of the bed, so we don’t really care.

  • Hello, Timbaland calling: the super-producer has announced a deal with Verizon Wireless to create a “mobile album,” available only on the carrier’s service. And you thought mp3s sounded bad! A Verizon spokesman managed to keep a straight face while calling the deal “a marriage of promotional opportunity and a large distribution platform,” but I bet he was doing something funny with his fingers behind his back.

  • Beck has confirmed that some of the lyrics on his seminal 1995 album Odelay were “scratch” lyrics, i.e., nonsense meant as a placeholder during the recording process. “We just grew attached to them,” said the singer. So you’re telling me those years I spent on my dissertation trying to parse “mouthwash jukebox gasoline” were a waste?

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