Clinton Stuns With $2.3B in 2009 Earmark Requests


Playing the game…

Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-N.Y.) has requested nearly $2.3 billion in federal earmarks for 2009, almost three times the largest amount received by a single senator this year.

The Democratic presidential candidate’s staggering request comes at a time when Congress remains engaged in a heated debate over spending federal dollars on parochial projects.

It also has gained traction on the campaign trail. Presumptive GOP nominee Sen. John McCain (Ariz.), a longtime foe of earmarks, has called for eliminating what he dubs “wasteful Washington spending.” Democratic front-runner Sen. Barack Obama (Ill.) has spurned earmarks, seeking no funds for pet projects in the upcoming fiscal year.

Particularly odd because in March, when anti-earmark sentiment was gaining traction, Clinton co-sponsored an amendment that would have banned earmarks for one year.

I’ve said all I’m going to say on this topic already. Find that here.

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