Levi’s Curve-Hugging (Sizes 0-4) Jeans

Levi's website

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I love curves. Curves are great. So when I heard San Francisco-based Levi’s introduced its new Curve ID fit system for women’s jeans, I was all in favor of it. Then I saw the ad, which uses slender models to demonstrate how Curve ID “custom fits” 80% of American women. Uh, sure, because 80% of American women are shaped like models? Not in the America where I live.

Levi’s had a great chance here to show they understand the diversity of women’s bodies. They could have used full-figured women or at least a model of color, but instead they chose to use slender models to demonstrate they understand how to fit American women who are on average 5’4″ and 160 lbs. The choice of traditional models is even more disappointing when you learn that Levi’s used 60,000 body scans from 13 countries to develop the fit system, reports the the Los Angeles Times. The jeans will only be offered in waist sizes 22 to 34, while the average American woman has a 37″ waist. I couldn’t find what percent of women have a 22″ waist, but I’m betting it’s far fewer than those with waists larger than 34″. So I’m not sure why Levi’s chose to pay to make 22″ jeans that’ll fit a few women rather than 36″ jeans that would fit far more.

Another flaw of the Curve ID system is that it only offers three different fits: slight curve, demi curve, and bold curve. I’ve seen some bold curves in my life, and they didn’t look like this. Even the Curve ID tagline is off-putting: “All Asses Were Not Created Equal.” You said it, Levi’s. Judging by your models, unless your ass is a size 0 to 4, apparently you’re not worthy of Levi’s Curve ID. Maybe this is why 73% of your customers aren’t women.

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