Alaska Senate Race Just Keeps Getting Weirder


Speaking of Alaska, if you’re not paying attention to the three-way-race up in the Last Frontier, you’re really missing out.

In just the past two weeks, we’ve had former Sen. Ted Stevens come back from the dead to endorse Lisa Murkowski. And in an appearance in Fairbanks last week, Murkowski burst into song to promote her write-in campaign. And hers is the relatively normal campaign when compared to Joe Miller’s.

Over the weekend, the tea-party backed Republican candidate admitted that he was suspended from his job with the Fairbanks North Star Borough for three days in 2008 for violating its ethics policy. “It is true, during a lunch hour I did get on borough computers and I participated in a private poll for about five minutes,” said Miller. “It was a mistake I made.”

But other reports state that, as a part-time employee, he didn’t get lunch breaks—and he was making a not-so-innocent attempt to oust state Republican Party Chairman Randy Ruedrich (a position he wanted for himself) by voting on four different office computers. And this comes after Miller’s security guards last week man-handled a reporter who was trying to ask about this very ethics issue. More information may be revealed later today, as a judge has ruled that Miller’s personnel files should be made public.

We’re eagerly awaiting those files, as I’m sure many folks are, given there’s only one week until the election.

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