Marco Rubio to Jobless: Get Out Of Town

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida). Lara Cerri/Tampa Bay Times/ZUMAPress

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Among the more intriguing proposals in Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida)’s War on Poverty anniversary speech Wednesday was giving jobless people subsidies to move to low-unemployment areas. Sounds like a common-sense fix? Maybe—but Mike Konczal, a expert in unemployment and inequality at the Roosevelt Institute, says it would just move the problem around.

Here’s why. Even though some states and localities have sunnier employment rates than others, Konczal tells Mother Jones, that doesn’t mean there are more jobs available in those places. “States with low unemployment are often small states that are heavily agricultural,” he says. “There is not a lot of dynamic turnover… There are already unemployed people there who want those jobs” that are open. Konczal had a deeper analysis of this type of proposal on the Washington Post’s Wonkblog last August, noting that such relocation vouchers would also likely go to”people who are at the back of the job queue—long-term unemployed with low savings. These are populations that will have trouble finding work, and so it is likely that they’d just move to be at the end of the queue of another state.”

Kevin Drum has more on Rubio’s other proposals, including a government wage subsidy.

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You expect the big picture, and it's our job at Mother Jones to give it to you. And right now, so many of the troubles we face are the making not of a virus, but of the quest for profit, political or economic (and not just from the man in the White House who could have offered leadership and comfort but instead gave us bleach).

In "News Is Just Like Waste Management," we unpack what the coronavirus crisis has meant for journalism, including Mother Jones’, and how we can rise to the challenge. If you're able to, this is a critical moment to support our nonprofit journalism with a donation: We've scoured our budget and made the cuts we can without impairing our mission, and we hope to raise $400,000 from our community of online readers to help keep our big reporting projects going because this extraordinary pandemic-plus-election year is no time to pull back.

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