Sanders May Have Broken the Law After Being Booted From Restaurant, Says Ex-White House Ethics Chief

The White House press secretary used her official Twitter account to send a less-than-official message.

Michael Brochstein/Zuma

Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.

After being asked to leave the a restaurant in Lexington, Virginia, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders took to Twitter. But while she may have seen it as a way to let Trump supporters know what happened to her, former White House ethics lawyer Walter Shaub says she may have broken the law.

Shaub tweeted that Sanders’ use of her official government account to tweet about the incident was a violation of ethics law because it discouraged patronage of the restaurant.

https://twitter.com/waltshaub/status/1010651510659846145

https://twitter.com/waltshaub/status/1010652947498328065

Stephanie Wilkinson, the owner of the Red Hen, explained that she asked Sanders to leave because she works for an “inhumane and unethical” administration and several of her employees who are a part of the LGBTQ community didn’t feel comfortable serving her.

If it was Sanders’ intent to discourage patronage, it might have worked. After the tweet, many conservatives took to Yelp to leave critical messages and vow never to visit the restaurant. 

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

payment methods

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2020 demands.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate