Mariah Blake

Mariah Blake

Senior Reporter

Mariah Blake is a senior reporter at Mother Jones. She has also written for The Atlantic, Foreign Policy, The Nation, The New Republic, the Washington Monthly, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among other publications. Email her at mblake [at] motherjones [dot] com or follow her on Twitter.

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Last Night's Other Big Winner: Minimum Wage Increases

| Wed Nov. 5, 2014 8:36 AM EST
Protesters rally outside a Burger King in Chicago as part of a campaign to raise the minimum wage for fast-food workers.

Election Day 2014 has been disastrous for Democrats, but on one top priority—hiking the minimum wage—the party made major gains, even in red-state America. Ballot initiatives raising the minimum wage passed with broad bipartisan support in Alaska, Arkansas, Nebraska, and South Dakota, where the measure polled better than any major statewide candidate from either party.

Watch "Duck Dynasty" Stars Rally the Christian Right for Tomorrow's Election

| Mon Nov. 3, 2014 12:55 PM EST

Last week, we reported on a coalition of influential conservative Christian organizations that are drumming up outrage over the Hobby Lobby case and other recent culture war skirmishes. The goal of this campaign—which involves closed-door briefings for pastors and rallies simulcast to mega-churches around the country—is to mobilize Christian voters by persuading them that their religious liberties are at stake in tomorrow's election.

On Sunday, the coalition held another simulcast rally, at Grace Community Church in Houston. And this time Phil Robertson, the Duck Dynasty star who was briefly suspended last year after going on an anti-gay tirade, was among the speakers. (Watch the video above.)

The bearded patriarch strode onto the stage Sunday clutching a dog-eared Bible and told the cheering crowd America was founded as a Christian nation. "America, America, it cannot be said too strongly or too often that this great nation was not founded by religionists but by Christians," he declared. "Not on religions, but on the Gospel of Jesus Christ." (Robertson attributed the quote to Patrick Henry; its origins are disputed). He then read a passage from Philippians about a Christian who was imprisoned for voicing his beliefs, and asserted that the same thing could happen in the United States. Robertson also likened the treatment of Christians today to the persecution Jesus faced: "They hated the son of God without reason, and now they hate us."

Fri Apr. 25, 2014 12:42 PM EDT