Monika Bauerlein

Monika Bauerlein

Editor in Chief

Since taking the helm at Mother Jones in 2006, Monika and her co-editor, Clara Jeffery, have won two National Magazine Awards, launched a nine-person Washington bureau, relaunched the website, given birth, and forgotten what it’s like to sleep.

Full Bio | Get my RSS |

Monika Bauerlein is co-editor of Mother Jones, where, together with Clara Jeffery, she spearheaded an era of editorial growth and innovation, marked by two National Magazine Awards for general excellence, the addition of a seven-person Washington Bureau, and an overhaul of the organization’s digital strategy that tripled MotherJones.com's traffic. Previously she was Mother Jones' investigative editor, focusing on long-form projects marrying in-depth reportage, document sleuthing, and narrative appeal. She has also worked as an alternative-weekly editor (at Minneapolis/St. Paul’s City Pages), a correspondent for US and European publications in Washington, D.C. and at the United Nations, an AP stringer, corporate trainer, translator, sausage slinger and fishing-line packager. She lives in Oakland.

Copenhagen: Time To Get Over Ourselves

| Mon Dec. 7, 2009 4:16 AM EST

A few hours ago, the United Nations agency that is organizing the Copenhagen climate conference sent out a beleaguered-sounding email saying that the conference venue fits 15,000, but 34,000 people—delegates from around the world, journalists, NGO representatives—are trying to attend, so they're implementing a "quota system." Does that mean Al and Leo will have to wait in line?

For updates on that and many other pressing questions, bookmark the Blue Marble, MoJo's environmental blog, which will be covering the climate talks 24/7. Our Washington bureau chief, David Corn, is headed there as we write, as is blogger Kate Sheppard, and essayist Bill McKibben. And because climate change is the biggest story of our lifetimes, we've also joined forces with a group of other journalism shops, including the Nation, Grist, Treehugger, the Center for Investigative Reporting/Frontline World, the Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting, and The Uptake—together, we have several dozen reporters on the ground, and we'll be using a nifty by-journalists-for-journalists technology called Publish2 to pull together all of their posts and stories. (Check the right-hand column of the Blue Marble for the feed, and also this page.)

Hey, if any group of people is harder to get to collaborate than politicians, it's probably journalists. If the latter can get over our myriad hangups and work together, maybe there's hope for the former. (P.S.—while you're thinking about it, why not put a picture of your kid--or your pet, favorite celebrity, or self—on our climate cover? It's a fun way to let your friends, or your representatives, know where you stand.)

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Watch: How GM is displacing indigenous Brazilians to create offsets for its SUVs

| Wed Nov. 4, 2009 12:42 PM EST

Mark Schapiro's story from our November/December issue, "GM's Money Trees," on a controversial carbon-offset in Brazil, has just gone live online. Traveling with Mark in the Amazon was a team from Frontline/World, the PBS investigative series, which has a multimedia companion piece to this story up on its new site, CarbonWatch. Here's a sample of what they found.

 

Make Your Own MoJo Climate Cover!

| Fri Oct. 23, 2009 7:25 AM EDT

Impatient? Skip this post, start playing with the app!
 
Still here? Okay. If you're sick of the political inaction (or worse) on the most important issue of our time; if you think your kid or your cat is the cutest ever; if you really need to one-up those relatives who always send out those perfect family greeting cards; or if you're frustrated by stick-figure cover models made possible only via the magic of Photoshop; well, Mother Jones is here to help.
 
We've made an app that lets you put your kid/cat/aunt/whatever on the cover of our issue devoted to the political and economic changes that climate change will bring. Send it to your friends, your members of Congress, even President Obama. We'll feature some on our site (if you give us permission, of course).
 
This is just one (fun) part of our efforts on this topic. We're also pulling together a broad collaborative effort between many prominent news organizations to cover this topic better than any of us could on our own. (Read an interview on this initiative here.) In a few weeks we're sending 350.org founder and MoJo contributor Bill McKibben, MoJo DC bureau chief David Corn and reporter Kate Sheppard to Copenhagen to cover the global climate talks. There, they'll team up with other news organizations, and even comedian Eugene Mirman, to give the conference the kind of fearless coverage it deserves.
 
We need your help to support our coverage. To send Bill, David, and Kate to Cophenhagen and keep the heat on. Imagine what it would mean if we hadn't exposed how ExxonMobil has been funding climate change denialists. Or how the US Chamber of Commerce inflated its membership numbers as part of its anti-climate initiative (reporting that's been hailed by the Washington Post Rachel Maddow, and the New Yorker, among others). Or why seemingly disparate weather issues have scientists so worried.
 
So please consider donating to Mother Jones. As a nonprofit, we depend on you to respect and support the kind of work we do. And when it comes to the climate, all of our futures hang in the balance.
 
Oh, and... go make your cover! And if you like it, tell your friends.

Fix the Climate, or the Kid Gets It

| Thu Oct. 15, 2009 12:36 AM EDT

Let's see. In climate news today, we have Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) announcing that you can get a climate bill through the Senate—so long as you include billions in loan guarantees for nuclear plants (because, well, the market thinks they're lousy investments and won't finance them. Safety issues aside.). Meanwhile Big Ag becomes the latest industry to launch a campaign to kill what measly climate legislation is on the table (never mind that farmers in general, and the heartland in particular, are likely to see some of global warming's worst effects). The Freakonomics guys muddle the issue with junk science. We're headed for a potential debacle during the global climate talks in Copenhagen, and virtually no one in Washington can really be bothered to pay attention to the issue anyway because health care reform is sucking up all the oxygen. Great!

So what is it going to take to get action on this issue? You know the answer—we all do: It's going to take popular pressure, aka politicians feeling that they have to produce something on this issue to get reelected. And that, in turn, takes convincing Americans that something we care about is actually at risk here. 

And of course something is. Climate change poses the greatest danger not to polar bears, not to glaciers or beaches, but to our kids. Their world, if you read the scientific predictions, is one where the Southwest is a dust bowl; 30 percent of the planet's species go extinct; 200 million people become climate refugees. And those are the relatively moderate scenarios--there are also the scientists who, looking back over millions of years' worth of geologic evidence, suggest that the last time we had carbon levels like those we're headed for now, sea levels were 80 to 130 feet higher than they are today. 

That's grim stuff, which is why, most of the time, our reaction is "quick, give me something else to think about!" But the love of our children is a powerful force, and it has motivated enormous change in the past. It hasn't become a real factor on this issue—but what if it did? As Clara and I write in our editors' note for the upcoming issue of Mother Jones, which is almost entirely devoted to this topic: 

"We still have the power to shape their future. Just for perspective: The entire sum required to buy off Third World opposition to carbon caps is around what we spent to bail out Fannie, Freddie, and AIG. And hey, Europe's on the hook for at least half. Our kids will measure us by how long we tarried. What will we tell them?"

To dramatize this point, we did something unusual for this special issue: We printed four different covers, featuring four different children and four different headlines. Now it's your turn. Next week, on the eve of International Day of Climate Action, we'll debut an app that lets you put your own picture (of your kid, yourself, your cat, your pet lizard) on our cover, and share the image with your friends and your members of Congress. There's also a contest to create new headlines for the climate cover—we'll feature the best on our home page. 

Meanwhile, today is Blog Action Day, which means that nearly 8,000 blogs from all around the world are posting climate-change content today. One of the first entries comes from British Prime Minister Gordon Brown. What's he got to say? 

Like every parent, I want to leave a safe and secure world for my children. And I want to be able to look them in the eye because our generation stood up for their future.

Hint, hint, White House Blog: President Obama, no doubt, would agree.

You can follow me on Twitter here. Clara tweets here. Our DC bureau chief, David Corn, tweets, as do our colleagues Daniel Schulman, Nick Baumann, Kate Sheppard, and Rachel Morris. And of course you can follow Mother Jones itself. 

 

 

Tue Mar. 12, 2013 9:40 PM EDT
Mon Feb. 18, 2013 1:02 AM EST
Fri Apr. 27, 2012 3:00 AM EDT
Sat Feb. 4, 2012 5:34 PM EST
Tue Jun. 21, 2011 5:47 PM EDT
Tue May. 3, 2011 3:19 AM EDT
Fri Feb. 4, 2011 5:00 AM EST
Mon Oct. 25, 2010 6:00 AM EDT
Mon Apr. 19, 2010 3:00 AM EDT
Mon Jan. 11, 2010 4:01 PM EST
Wed Dec. 30, 2009 6:33 AM EST
Mon Dec. 7, 2009 4:16 AM EST
Wed Nov. 4, 2009 12:42 PM EST
Fri Oct. 23, 2009 7:25 AM EDT
Thu Oct. 15, 2009 12:36 AM EDT
Wed Sep. 23, 2009 3:01 AM EDT
Thu Sep. 10, 2009 10:11 PM EDT
Thu Aug. 20, 2009 12:46 AM EDT
Sat Aug. 15, 2009 12:49 PM EDT
Thu Aug. 13, 2009 2:39 PM EDT
Tue Aug. 11, 2009 2:12 PM EDT
Tue Aug. 11, 2009 7:00 AM EDT
Thu Aug. 6, 2009 2:36 PM EDT
Thu Aug. 6, 2009 4:30 AM EDT
Mon Jun. 1, 2009 8:25 AM EDT
Wed Mar. 25, 2009 5:51 PM EDT
Thu Feb. 19, 2009 2:22 AM EST
Tue Feb. 17, 2009 7:55 PM EST
Tue Jan. 6, 2009 5:09 PM EST
Tue Dec. 23, 2008 6:00 PM EST
Wed Dec. 17, 2008 4:42 PM EST
Tue Nov. 4, 2008 3:46 AM EST
Fri Sep. 26, 2008 1:59 AM EDT