Tim Murphy

Tim Murphy

Reporter

Tim Murphy is a reporter in MoJo's DC bureau. Last summer he logged 22,000 miles while blogging about his cross-country road trip for Mother Jones. His writing has been featured in Slate and the Washington Monthly. Email him with tips and insights at tmurphy [at] motherjones [dot] com.

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Ohio Gubernatorial Candidate's Group Compared Obama to Hitler, Stalin

| Mon Jan. 6, 2014 1:24 PM EST

On Tuesday, Ohio businessman Ted Stevenot will announce he would challenge Gov. John Kasich in May's Republican primary. Stevenot is, by his own admission, a relative newcomer to state politics and has not run for a major office before. His main credential prior to entering the race was his 10-month stint as president of the Ohio Liberty Coalition, a statewide network of tea party groups. The OLC's agenda tracks closely with similar tea party groups in other states: It opposes the Common Core natural curriculum standard, it worries that the state's elected Republicans are too soft on President Obama, and it likes guns.

But the group has a habit of expressing its views in inflammatory ways. A photo posted to its Facebook page (see above) last January, shortly before Stevenot took over, compares Obama to a collection of notorious dictators, including Fidel Castro, Joseph Stalin, and Adolf Hitler, because of their shared habit of occasionally appearing in photos with children. Another image recommends using assault rifles against "the people who try to take them away"—in this case, the federal government:

Ohio Liberty Coalition/Facebook

And here's the president of the United States, after being punched in the face:

Ohio Liberty Coalition/Facebook

Stevenot has accused Kasich of being too close to Obama, because the governor used federal funding to expand the state's Medicaid program. He's not leaving himself open to a similar charge.

Update: Stevenot has dropped out of the race, leaving Ohio tea partiers without a candidate.

Ohio Republican Gov. Expands Medicaid, Gets a Primary Challenge

| Thu Jan. 2, 2014 1:20 PM EST

Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio).

Under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, the federal government is covering the vast majority of the cost of expanding Medicaid, the joint state-federal health insurance program for poor people, pregnant women, and infants. But conservatives in 24 states have blocked the program's expansion—and taken aim at anyone who breaks with the party line. Their newest target: Ohio Republican Gov. John Kasich, who went around the state legislature last year to cover 275,000 more Ohioans. On Thursday, Ted Stevenot, the former president of the Ohio Liberty Coalition, a tea party group, announced he would take on Kasich in the May gubernatorial primary, provided he can collect 1,000 signatures by the end of the month. Per the Huffington Post:

Stevenot sent out a release late Wednesday night saying he would hold a press conference Jan. 7 in Columbus to make a "major announcement" concerning his candidacy. The announcement also noted that Brenda Mack of Canfield, Ohio, will be his running mate as lieutenant governor. She is the former president of the Ohio Black Republicans Association and the current president of the Frederick Douglass Foundation Ohio Chapter.

As my colleague Andy Kroll noted in May, conservative unrest over Kasich has been brewing for a while, with tea partiers even going so far as to threaten to form their own party to oppose him. But President Barack Obama won Ohio twice, and Kasich's signature anti-union legislation was soundly defeated at the polls. That puts the governor in a bind as he heads into what was already expected to be a tough re-election fight next fall.

Still, Stevenot isn't exactly Grover Norquist. The tea party leader has no political experience and only a very short history of political activism. At last count, had just 17 followers on Twitter. The big news here might not be that Kasich finally got a primary challenge—it's that the primary challenger is (at first glance, at least) so underwhelming.

The 39 Worst Words, Phrases, and Parts of Speech of 2013

| Fri Dec. 27, 2013 7:00 AM EST

Many words were spoken in 2013. Not all of them were created equal. Here is a brief, but by no means complete, guide to the words and phrases (and symbols, and parts of speech) we'd like to retire in 2014.

Please print this out and post it to your refrigerator or cubicle wall for convenient access.

  • "#." R.I.P., early Twitter feature. We'll bury you next to your friend, the FourSquare check-in.
  • adverbs. Ban all adverbs. They're mostly just gulp words, really.
  • "all the things."
  • "because [noun]": (e.g. "because science.")
  • "brogurt." No.
  • "classy."
  • "controversial tweet." There's just no way to make this sound dignified, and besides, it leads to think pieces.
  • "cronut."
  • "crowdsourced."
  • "derp." It's been an emotional ride, but it's time to send this one off on the ice floe.
  • "disrupt." Luxury car apps aren't disruptive.
  • "Donald Trump is considering a run for…" No, he's not. He just isn't. And if you'd like to get him unearned publicity, you should at least get some stock options out of it.
  • "doubled down." Unless the candidate did it while biting into a delicious sandwich, let's just say the candidate "reaffirmed his/her position" on transportation funding or burrito drones or whatever we'll be discussing in 2014.
  • "...favorited a tweet you were mentioned in." No one has ever wanted to know this.
  • "gaffe." It's going to be a long-enough election year as it is.
  • "game-changer." What you're describing probably won't change the game. But if it does, would you want to spoil the moment with a cliche?
  • "Guy Fieri." What if we all decided to just never mention him again? Would he disappear?
  • "hashtag." This refers to the spoken utterance of the word "hashtag," often accompanied by air-quotes. People can see you doing this.
  • "hipster." Wearing glasses is not something people do because they're hipsters; it's something people do because they're nearsighted. People don't drink hot chocolate because it's a hipster thing to do; they drink hot chocolate because it's literally liquid chocolate. Yes, I wrote "literally." That's what happens when you use a word so casually and carelessly in think pieces as to render it meaningless.
  • "I can't even." You can. Dig deep. Find your Kentucky.
  • "impact." (When used as a verb.)
  • "…in .gifs."
  • "...in one chart." We're aiming high in 2014. Two chart minimum!
  • "listicle." This is the last one.
  • "literally the worst." Actually, while we're at it, let's ban "literally." Literally is the "not the Onion" of fake things.
  • "millennial." Young people are living with their parents because their parents' generation destroyed the global economy. Next.
  • "nondescript office park." As opposed to the Frank Gehry ones.
  • "not the Onion."
  • "Rethuglicans, Repugs," "Republikkkans," "Demoncrats," "Dumbocrats," and every other variation thereof. Please just use the normal proper nouns; you can add whatever modifier you like before or after.
  • "selfie." But what do they tell us about our society, in the digital now? Let's ask James Franco.
  • "Snowfall." (In the future, a high-cost digital production that doesn't live up to the hype shall be known as a "Skyfall.")
  • "the Internets." This was a George W. Bush joke or something, right? You can still use the Internet—just drop the "s."
  • "This Town."
  • "thought leader." Mostly beaten out of existence, but don't think we didn't notice that Paul Allen interview, Wired. You're on notice.
  • #YOLO. Seriously.

I am guilty of most of these sins. Let us never speak of this again.

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