Tim Murphy

Tim Murphy

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Tim Murphy is a senior reporter at Mother Jones. Email him with tips and insights at tmurphy@motherjones.com.

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In South Carolina, a Racist Newsletter Endorses Trump

| Fri Feb. 19, 2016 12:06 PM EST

While Sen. Ted Cruz was firing up conservatives at an arena in Greenville, South Carolina, on Thursday night, someone—presumably a supporter of Donald Trump—was leaving copies of a racist far-right newsletter on the windshields of cars parked outside the venue. Here's the front page:

The Conservative Action Report appears to be affiliated with the South Carolina Conservative Action Council, which "proudly" defends the "Confederate South" and the Confederate flag. (This weekend, the group will hold an event to commemorate the Union army's "satanic" attack on Charleston.) One front-page story in the newsletter is headlined "Is Barack Obama a Muslim?" Another is called "Blacks and the Confederacy—the story the leftist mass media will never tell." An op-ed in the newsletter refers to Gov. Nikki Haley by her birth name, Nimrada Randhawa, and attacks her for her "Stalinesque" decision to remove the Confederate flag from the statehouse grounds after last year's mass shooting in Charleston.

The newsletter, which endorses Trump and hails his proposed wall along the Mexican border, also slams Cruz (on trade) and Marco Rubio (on immigration).

The South Carolina Republican primary this year has so far been bereft of the slanderous whisper campaigns that have marked elections of the past in the Palmetto State. And this isn't exactly a "dirty trick." But it is a glimpse of the far extreme of the Trump coalition, which may well carry the Muslim-bashing tycoon to victory on Saturday.

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What Happens to Marco Rubio if the GOP Isn't Ready for the Future?

| Fri Feb. 19, 2016 7:00 AM EST

The premise of Marco Rubio's campaign in South Carolina is a simple one. It was best summed up by Rubio spokesman Alex Conant: Rubio is building "a Republican Party that doesn't look like your dad's Republican Party."

For evidence, one need look no further than the group of wisecracking young GOP politicians who joined him at the Swamp Rabbit CrossFit gym in Greenville on Thursday morning. The group included Sen. Tim Scott, the first African American senator from the South since Reconstruction, who occupies the seat formerly held by segregationist Strom Thurmond; Gov. Nikki Haley, the daughter of Sikh immigrants, who led the push to remove the Confederate flag from the grounds of the state Capitol last year; and Rep. Trey Gowdy, who chairs the Benghazi committee. Okay, Gowdy is a white guy, but he is at least Gen X and also a wizard. And they were all at the gym to endorse the son of Cuban immigrants who jokes about his fluency in Spanish while campaigning in a state where legislators have regularly pushed English-only laws.

Rubio's surrogates drew attention to their diversity with varying degrees of subtlety. "He is honest, he is humble, he is historic, he represents our state in an incredible way," Gowdy said of Scott.

"She understands the journey of the American dream in a very unique way," Scott said of Haley.

"Take a picture of this," Haley said of the four of them, when they came on stage for a curtain call at the Swamp Rabbit. "Because a new group of conservatives has taken over America. It looks like a Benetton commercial!"

For his part, Rubio likes to emphasize his youth (he's 44, he says, but feels 45) and boasts that he hails from a "new generation" that can "turn the page" on the 20th century. He doesn't talk much about migrants or refugees. (When asked about American Muslims, he sounds like he'd rather be somewhere else.)

But two days before the primary, Rubio is in third place in the polls in the Palmetto State, and—not-so-fun fact—no third-place finisher in this state has ever gone on to win the presidential nomination. One reason he trails Donald Trump and Ted Cruz is because at this moment the Republican past is crushing the GOP's future. Rubio is getting hammered on the airwaves by his opponents for being too soft on undocumented immigrants. And his promise to usher in a new generation is being drowned out by the ultranativist promises of Trump, who derives much of his support from his pledge to build a gigantic wall on the Mexican border and his proposal to ban Muslims from coming to the United States.

Even as South Carolina has welcomed and embraced its Benetton conservatives, a huge chunk of Republican voters are apparently motivated by the traditional divides. For Rubio, this is an existential challenge: What happens to the candidate of the future if the future isn't really here yet?

Even Ted Cruz's Best Friend in the Senate Is Campaigning for Rubio

| Thu Feb. 18, 2016 6:44 PM EST

Ted Cruz has many enemies in the United States Senate, and only one pretty good friend: Republican Sen. Mike Lee of Utah, who, like Cruz, is a tea party darling. So it must have been welcome news in the Cruz camp when Lee came to South Carolina this week to hit the campaign trail with Cruz. (Remember, Donald Trump has been knocking Cruz as an unlikable, nasty guy, and pointing out that not one of his Senate colleagues has endorsed him.)

There was just one catch: Lee was campaigning with Cruz, but he wasn't endorsing him. In fact, hours before Lee gave a speech introducing and praising Cruz at a barbecue joint in Easley, South Carolina, Lee hailed Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida at a CrossFit gym in nearby Greenville, where he told an audience of conservatives, "I don't know anyone in Washington who knows the Bible quite as well as Marco Rubio does."

For now, Lee is undecided about whom to support in the Republican presidential primary and apparently playing the field. (He told reporters in Easley that he would endorse someone, sometime.) That has put him in an awkward position as a supporter of two competing candidates currently locked in a fight about who is or isn't a scoundrel. Even more awkward was that Lee delivered essentially the same speech for both Rubio and Cruz: a historical allegory about the lessons of the Boston Tea Party and the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

As Cruz tries to maintain second place in the South's first primary state, he has brought in a few reinforcements. Reps. Steve King of Iowa and Louie Gohmert of Texas (known for coining the term "terror babies") joined him to talk up Cruz's anti-immigration bona fides. But Rubio, who is fiercely challenging Cruz for second—both trail Trump in the polls—has greater local support and is traveling the state with the "cavalry." That's what Republican Sen. Tim Scott calls the South Carolina lawmakers in Rubio's corner: Gov. Nikki Haley, Rep. Trey Gowdy (of Benghazi committee fame), and Scott himself. Scott and Gowdy, who each display a half-decent comedic repartee at Rubio campaign events, teamed up for a radio ad on Rubio's behalf.

In a street fight like this, Cruz could use more prominent allies. But he couldn't even get his buddy Lee to go all the way with an endorsement.

Ben Carson Uses Justice Scalia's Death for a Campaign Ad

| Thu Feb. 18, 2016 1:45 PM EST

All the Republican presidential candidates have seized on the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia to make the case for electing one of their own next fall, but Ben Carson is the first of this lot to exploit the justice's passing for a radio ad. In a spot running on conservative talk radio in South Carolina, a narrator declares that Scalia's unrelenting opposition to affirmative action was a defining part of his legacy and then promises that Carson will carry the torch for the late justice by promoting "compassionate action" if elected president.

Scalia believed that "we are just one race—American," the ad begins. Then it continues:

He thought affirmative action was wrong. That racial entitlement preserves the way of thinking that produced slavery, racial privilege, and hatred. More than anyone else running for president, Dr. Ben Carson knows about race—and hatred. He was raised in the ghettos of Detroit. He saw the face of hatred, bigotry, and violence firsthand. So when Dr. Carson says we should replace affirmative action with compassionate action, that it's a fairer way to treat people, we should listen to him.

The ad is consistent with what Carson has been saying throughout the campaign—that left-wing "political correctness" poses a greater threat to the United States than, say, the structural racism that affirmative action seeks to address. And with this radio spot, the only African American candidate in the race is seeking to win back GOP voters by citing the fellow whom many conservatives embraced as their movement's most prominent anti-PC crusader. As the ad notes—in something of a non sequitur—"Judge Scalia's life has taught us, if you’ve lived the life you believe in, you've earned the right to speak about what it has taught you. The rest is just political correctness."

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