Torture For Thee, But Not For Me


Glenn Greenwald was on NPR yesterday to talk about their policy of refusing to call torture by its proper name, and while he was waiting to go on he listened to NPR’s ombudsman explaining their policy:

She also said — when the host asked about the recent example I cited of NPR’s calling what was done to a reporter in Gambia “torture” (at the 20:20 mark) — that NPR will use the word “torture” to describe what other governments do because they do it merely to sadistically inflict pain on people while the U.S. did it for a noble reason:  to obtain information about Terrorist attacks.  That’s really what she said:  that when the U.S. did it (as opposed to Evil countries), it was for a good reason.

Jeez, that Glenn.  Always exaggerating.  For the record, here’s what she actually said about NPR’s piece on Gambia:

In that case, these were strictly tactics to torture him, to punish him, versus in the United States, and the way that it’s used, these are tactics used to get information.  The Gambian journalist was in jail for his beliefs.

Wow.  She really did say that, didn’t she?  When other people do it for other reasons, it’s torture.  When we do it for our reasons, it’s not.

You don’t usually find people willing to say this quite so baldly.  Congratulations, Alicia Shepard.

THANK YOU.

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