The Rich and Their Taxes


Tax data is always a few years out of date, so today David Cay Johnston reports on how the rich did during the last of the boom years:

In 2007 the top 400 taxpayers had an average income of $344.8 million, up 31 percent from their average $263.3 million income in 2006, according to figures in a report that the IRS posted to its Web site….

Their effective income tax rate fell to 16.62 percent, down more than half a percentage point from 17.17 percent in 2006, the new data show. That rate is lower than the typical effective income tax rate paid by Americans with incomes in the low six figures….Payroll taxes did not add a significant burden to the top 400, not changing the rounding of rates by even one decimal. With payroll taxes taken into account, the effective tax rate of the top 400 would be 17.2 percent in 2006 and 16.6 percent in 2007, my analysis shows — the same as not counting payroll taxes. As a point of comparison, about two-thirds of Americans pay more in Social Security, Medicare, and unemployment taxes than in federal income taxes.

I don’t know about you, but Johnston is certainly right about me: I make considerably less than $344 million a year and I pay considerably more than 16.6% in federal taxes. This, of course, is fair, because, um, the rich really hate paying taxes. So there.

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