Organizing the Middle Class


Matt Yglesias has a complaint:

I think labor-friendly writers sometimes don’t do the best possible job of distinguishing between unions qua social and political institutions and collective bargaining as a labor market institution. Something like EFCA is the only way to revive collective bargaining as a major force in private sector labor markets. But I don’t think it’s correct to see EFCA → union density as the only conceivable form of politically influential mass membership organization. 

Actually, I’m pretty sure that most labor-friendly writers are keenly aware of this distinction. But put that aside. It’s obviously true that organized labor isn’t the only conceivable form of politically influential mass membership organization. The question is whether it’s the only conceivable form of politically influential mass membership organization dedicated to the economic concerns of the middle class. Right now I’d say it is for the simple reason that no one seems able to conceive of an alternative. But I sure wish someone would.

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