Thousands of spectators viewed the "ring of fire" at the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta.Katie Oyan/AP

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A solar eclipse formed a “ring of fire” on Saturday on a trail from Oregon to Texas before moving down to Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and Brazil. 

Crowds gathered along a 125-mile wide path to watch the “moment of annularity,” when the moon was directly in front of the sun, leaving a halo of light. Annular eclipses happen when the moon is at its farthest point from the earth. During these moments—which lasted more than four minutes in some places—the light dims and the air cools.

Unfortunately, some parts of the country were overcast when the eclipse took place, but nonetheless, here are some of our favorite photos and videos:

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