Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.


Our 1991 story on Russian ultranationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky (“The Coup: Next Time,” Nov./Dec.) profiled the ambitious and dangerous man whose party had such unexpected success in last December’s elections. The question is, could he become Russia’s next president? Three scenarios could make this possible: 1) mounting tensions between Russia and Ukraine over Crimea, a predominantly Russian region that was shuffled over to Ukraine during the Soviet period. Communists on both sides are backing their respective nationalists. A disruptive conflict would give Zhirinovsky’s extremist alliance, which includes hard-line Communists, a fresh raison d’etre; 2) conflict in the former Yugoslavia could result in increased Western pressure on Serbia, a traditional Russian ally, giving Russia’s conservatives an excuse to demand intervention. Revival of Cold War antagonisms would disrupt Russia’s relations with the international community and sabotage the country’s reform process; 3) Boris Yeltsin’s untimely death–or debilitating illness–could create a power vacuum before his term expires in 1996. Or if Yeltsin’s popularity plummets and he exits before reformers can unite behind a single candidate, Zhirinovsky and his coalition could easily take advantage of the reformers’ disarray.

HERE ARE THE FACTS:

Our fall fundraising drive is off to a rough start, and we very much need to raise $250,000 in the next couple of weeks. If you value the journalism you get from Mother Jones, please help us do it with a donation today.

As we wrote over the summer, traffic has been down at Mother Jones and a lot of sites with many people thinking news is less important now that Donald Trump is no longer president. But if you're reading this, you're not one of those people, and we're hoping we can rally support from folks like you who really get why our reporting matters right now. And that's how it's always worked: For 45 years now, a relatively small group of readers (compared to everyone we reach) who pitch in from time to time has allowed Mother Jones to do the type of journalism the moment demands and keep it free for everyone else.

Please pitch in with a donation during our fall fundraising drive if you can. We can't afford to come up short, and there's still a long way to go by November 5.

payment methods

ONE MORE QUICK THING:

Our fall fundraising drive is off to a rough start, and we very much need to raise $250,000 in the next couple of weeks. If you value the journalism you get from Mother Jones, please help us do it with a donation today.

As we wrote over the summer, traffic has been down at Mother Jones and a lot of sites with many people thinking news is less important now that Donald Trump is no longer president. But if you're reading this, you're not one of those people, and we're hoping we can rally support from folks like you who really get why our reporting matters right now. And that's how it's always worked: For 45 years now, a relatively small group of readers (compared to everyone we reach) who pitch in from time to time has allowed Mother Jones to do the type of journalism the moment demands and keep it free for everyone else.

Please pitch in with a donation during our fall fundraising drive if you can. We can't afford to come up short, and there's still a long way to go by November 5.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate