Unmarrieds and Singles, Your Time is Coming


singles.png

By which I mean National Unmarried and Single Americans Week (Sept. 17-23) is coming! So plan something. Go out. Or stay home. The week is an opportunity to join together (temporarily!) to, as this website puts it, “C-E-L-E-B-R-A-T-E the lives and contributions of unmarried and single Americans!” In any event, here, via ResourceShelf, are some “fast facts” from the U.S. Census about this segment of the population (which comprises about 90 million people, or 41 percent of all U.S. residents age 18 and older).

Single Life
54
Percentage of unmarried and single Americans who are women.

60
Percentage of unmarried and single Americans who have never been married. Another 25 percent are divorced and 15 percent are widowed.

14.9 million
Number of unmarried and single Americans age 65 and older. These older Americans comprise 14 percent of all unmarried and single people.

86
Number of unmarried men age 18 and older for every 100 unmarried women in the United States.

55 million
Number of households maintained by unmarried men or women. These households comprise 49 percent of households nationwide.

29.9 million
Number of people who live alone. These persons comprise 26 percent of all households, up from 17 percent in 1970

Parenting
32
Percentage of births in 2004 to unmarried women.

12.9 million
Number of single parents living with their children in 2005. Of these, 10.4 million are single mothers.

40
Percentage of opposite-sex, unmarried-partner households that include children.

672,000
Number of unmarried grandparents who were caregivers for their grandchildren in 2004. They comprised nearly 3-in-10 grandparents who were responsible for their grandchildren. (Source: American FactFinder)

Unmarried Couples
4.9 million

Number of unmarried-partner households in 2005. These households consist of a householder living with someone of the opposite sex who was identified as their unmarried partner.

Dating
904

The number of dating service establishments nationwide as of 2002. These establishments, which include Internet dating services, employed nearly 4,300 people and pulled in $489 million in revenues.

Voters
36
Percentage of voters in the 2004 presidential election who were unmarried.

Education
82

Percentage of unmarried people age 25 or older in 2004 who were high-school graduates.

23
Percentage of unmarried people age 25 or older with a bachelor’s degree or more education.

DOES IT FEEL LIKE POLITICS IS AT A BREAKING POINT?

Headshot of Editor in Chief of Mother Jones, Clara Jeffery

It sure feels that way to me, and here at Mother Jones, we’ve been thinking a lot about what journalism needs to do differently, and how we can have the biggest impact.

We kept coming back to one word: corruption. Democracy and the rule of law being undermined by those with wealth and power for their own gain. So we're launching an ambitious Mother Jones Corruption Project to do deep, time-intensive reporting on systemic corruption, and asking the MoJo community to help crowdfund it.

We aim to hire, build a team, and give them the time and space needed to understand how we got here and how we might get out. We want to dig into the forces and decisions that have allowed massive conflicts of interest, influence peddling, and win-at-all-costs politics to flourish.

It's unlike anything we've done, and we have seed funding to get started, but we're looking to raise $500,000 from readers by July when we'll be making key budgeting decisions—and the more resources we have by then, the deeper we can dig. If our plan sounds good to you, please help kickstart it with a tax-deductible donation today.

Thanks for reading—whether or not you can pitch in today, or ever, I'm glad you're with us.

Signed by Clara Jeffery

Clara Jeffery, Editor-in-Chief

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our newsletters

Subscribe and we'll send Mother Jones straight to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate

Share your feedback: We’re planning to launch a new version of the comments section. Help us test it.