After Her Big Win, Status Quo or Change at Clinton HQ?


Last night–that is, at 1:30 in the morning–I ran into a top Hillary Clinton adviser at the bar in the Radisson Hotel in Manchester, New Hampshire. She was beaming. Earlier in the day, she had said to me, “I’m just praying the spread is 9.9 percent”–meaning she was hoping that Barack Obama would not win by double digits. Well, that was then. Joking, I said that I could imagine Clinton sending Mark Penn, her chief strategist, a telegram that said, “Stop. Come back. Stop. All is forgiven. Stop.” Her eye opened wide and she exclaimed, “Oh, I hope not.” Clinton’s narrow victory in New Hampshire, she said, was not a vindication, but a warning. “We still need to retool,” she explained. “This is not over.” Clinton would have to change plenty from here on: be more open to the media, not be so over-handled. New Hampshire, she added, had been a near-death experience for Hillary Clinton. “We need to learn from our mistakes,” she said. This aide was hoping for big changes within the Clinton campaign. Will that come? I asked. “You never know, politics can be unpredictable,” she said with a smile.

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  • David Corn

    David Corn is Mother Jones' Washington bureau chief and an on-air analyst for MSNBC. He is the co-author (with Michael Isikoff) of Russian Roulette: The Inside Story of Putin’s War on America and the Election of Donald Trump. He is the author of three New York Times bestsellers, Showdown, Hubris (with Isikoff), and The Lies of George W. Bush, as well as the e-book, 47 Percent: Uncovering the Romney Video that Rocked the 2012 Election. For more of his stories, click here. He's also on Twitter and Facebook.