Bruno: “F***ing Awesome”

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From Ain’t It Cool News via Towleroad come the first reviews of Bruno, Sacha Baron Cohen’s bigger, badder and oh-so-much-gayer followup to Borat. We’ve covered Bruno’s shenanigans as he terrorized Kansas and punked a former Mossad agent, but apparently those are only the tamest of the antics on display. The movie doesn’t come out until July 10 (with the first “official” sneak peak taking place at the upcoming SXSW), but a couple lucky ducks got into early test screenings and sent their thoughts to Ain’t It Cool. I hope they’re legit, as both reviews were filled with gushing, hyperbolic praise: the first called the film “everything I was hoping for—shocking, jaw-dropping and TOTALLY FUCKING HILARIOUS,” while the second managed to quantify Bruno as “10 times sharper, wittier and altogether ballsier” than Borat. Not bad. Apparently the plot revolves around the Austrian fashion reporter character we know and love trying to “make it big”:

He heads to the US to become a famous celebrity, but everything he tries to make himself famous – shooting a tv pilot, being an extra in a movie, bringing peace to the middle east, adopting a baby – doesn’t work, and he concludes it’s his gayness that’s holding him back. So he decides to become straight and the last third of the film revolve around his efforts to become a “normal” heterosexual male, climaxing (pun intended) with him hosting a cage fight for thousands of crazy rednecks.

So great. The film sounds like a wild ride, but more than anything, it was heartening to see two clearly (insistently!) heterosexual reviewers give the film props for its expose of anti-gay prejudice, with one saying Baron Cohen has “huge, ginormous balls” for putting himself in dangerous situations to make clear that “homophobia is alive and well in the US.” The reviews also gave away the names of some music mega-stars who contributed a song to the film, although I’ll let you decide if you want to click through for that little spoiler.

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WE'LL BE BLUNT.

We have a considerable $390,000 gap in our online fundraising budget that we have to close by June 30. There is no wiggle room, we've already cut everything we can, and we urgently need more readers to pitch in—especially from this specific blurb you're reading right now.

We'll also be quite transparent and level-headed with you about this.

In "News Never Pays," our fearless CEO, Monika Bauerlein, connects the dots on several concerning media trends that, taken together, expose the fallacy behind the tragic state of journalism right now: That the marketplace will take care of providing the free and independent press citizens in a democracy need, and the Next New Thing to invest millions in will fix the problem. Bottom line: Journalism that serves the people needs the support of the people. That's the Next New Thing.

And it's what MoJo and our community of readers have been doing for 47 years now.

But staying afloat is harder than ever.

In "This Is Not a Crisis. It's The New Normal," we explain, as matter-of-factly as we can, what exactly our finances look like, why this moment is particularly urgent, and how we can best communicate that without screaming OMG PLEASE HELP over and over. We also touch on our history and how our nonprofit model makes Mother Jones different than most of the news out there: Letting us go deep, focus on underreported beats, and bring unique perspectives to the day's news.

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