Rep. Hank Johnson Thinks Guam Could Capsize

Courtesy of the office of Rep. Hank Johnson.


It couldn’t have been easy for Admiral Robert Willard, the commander of the U.S. Pacific Command, to maintain a straight face during his completely bizarre grilling by Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Ga.) last week. Willard was testifying before the House Armed Services Committee at a hearing concerning his command’s FY 2011 budget. Part of the hearing centered on plans to shift thousands of US troops from Okinawa to Guam. This move is likely to put a serious strain on the tiny island—but not the kind that Johnson is worried about. Take it away, Hank:

My fear is that the whole island will become so overly populated that it will tip over and capsize.

To which Willard, who appears to be stifling a grin, says:

We don’t anticipate that. The Guam population, I think, currently about 175,000, and again, with 8,000 marines and their families, it’s an addition of about 25,000 more into the population.

Earlier, in another cringe-worthy moment, Johnson goes into exhaustive detail about the island’s dimensions, eventually posing this question to the admiral: “I don’t know how many square miles it is, do you happen to know?”

Willard: “I don’t have that figure with me, sir, but I could certainly supply it to you if you’d like.”

Since Willard definitely has more important things to do than Google the square mileage of Guam, I’ll save him the trouble: approximately 212.

Jon Stewart needs to send Johnson a thank you note. You can’t make this stuff up.
 

UPDATE: Johnson, via his spokesman, responds:

“I wasn’t suggesting that the island of Guam would literally tip over,” said Johnson. “I was using a metaphor to say that with the addition of 8,000 Marines and their dependents – an additional 80,000 people during peak construction to the port on the tiny island with a population of 180,000 – could be a tipping point which would adversely affect the island’s fragile ecosystem and over burden its already overstressed infrastructure.

“Having traveled to Guam last year, I saw firsthand how this beautiful – but vulnerable island – is already overburdened, and I was simply voicing my concerns that the addition of that many people could tip the delicate balance and do harm to Guam.”

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