Republican Senators Plan Collective Tantrum Over Electoral College Results

It likely won’t amount to anything but a very long day on Wednesday.

Sens. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., left, and Ted Cruz, R-Texas, attend the Senate Judiciary Committee markup on judicial nominations and the "Online Content Policy Modernization Act," in Dirksen Building on Thursday, December 10, 2020.Tom Williams

Fight disinformation. Get a daily recap of the facts that matter. Sign up for the free Mother Jones newsletter.

Update, Jan. 2, 2020, 1:07 p.m. ET: Sens. Ted Cruz, Ron Johnson, James Lankford, Steve Daines, John Kennedy, Marsha Blackburn, Mike Braun, Cynthia Lummis, Roger Marshall, Bill Hagerty, and
Tommy Tuberville have released a joint statement confirming their plans to throw a tantrum on Wednesday. 

It was too much to hope for that 2021 would bring a quiet, routine certification of the Electoral College’s confirmation that Joe Biden won the presidency, followed by a peaceful transfer of power. 

According to Axios, a cadre of senators—led, of course, by Sen. Ted Cruz—plan to announce today that they will object to Wednesday’s certification of the Electoral College results. Sens. Mike Braun of Indiana and Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee are reportedly involved, along with incoming Sen. Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming. Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and Senator-elect Tommy Tuberville of Alabama have also said they are considering similar action. All of this comes on the heels of Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley’s announcement last week that he plans to object. 

It’s likely that this will amount to little more than a collective hissy fit thrown by Republicans who refuse to accept the will of the majority. If nothing else, their stunt promises a very long day on Wednesday—as Axios explains:

Any member can raise an objection. If both a representative and a senator object to an individual state’s result, members of the House and Senate head to their separate chambers to debate and vote on whether to uphold the challenge. Each vote could take up to two hours.

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2021 demands.

payment methods

FACT:

Mother Jones was founded as a nonprofit in 1976 because we knew corporations and the wealthy wouldn't fund the type of hard-hitting journalism we set out to do.

Today, reader support makes up about two-thirds of our budget, allows us to dig deep on stories that matter, and lets us keep our reporting free for everyone. If you value what you get from Mother Jones, please join us with a tax-deductible donation today so we can keep on doing the type of journalism 2021 demands.

payment methods

We Recommend

Latest

Sign up for our free newsletter

Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily to have our top stories delivered directly to your inbox.

Get our award-winning magazine

Save big on a full year of investigations, ideas, and insights.

Subscribe

Support our journalism

Help Mother Jones' reporters dig deep with a tax-deductible donation.

Donate