David Corn

David Corn

Washington Bureau Chief

Corn has broken stories on presidents, politicians, and other Washington players. He's written for numerous publications and is a talk show regular. His best-selling books include Hubris: The Inside Story of Spin, Scandal, and the Selling of the Iraq War.

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On NPR, McCain Exaggerates Past Relationship with Palin

| Wed Oct. 1, 2008 1:30 PM EDT

Is John McCain exaggerating his past relationship with Sarah Palin?

On Wednesday, NPR's Steve Inskeep interviewed McCain, and he started the session with questions about McCain's running mate, Governor Sarah Palin. Noting that Palin had repeatedly pointed to Alaska's proximity to Russia, Inskeep asked what that adds to her foreign policy qualifications. McCain referred to "the fact that they have had certain relationships." Presumably, by "they" he meant Alaska and Russia, but he did not specify what these "relationships" entailed. And Inskeep did not ask him to. (In her interview with Katie Couric, Palin referred to trade missions between her state and Russia--activity which apparently did not involve her.) McCain then changed the subject and maintained that Palin has great expertise on energy issues, inelegantly remarking, "She has oversighted the natural gas and oil and natural resources of the state of Alaska."

Then came a dramatic statement. Inskeep asked, "Is there an occasion when you can imagine turning to Gov. Palin for advice on a foreign policy crisis." McCain replied,

I've turned to her advice many times in the past.

Many times in the past? According to the McCain campaign, McCain first met Palin in February at a Washington meeting of the National Governors Association. Here's how McCain's own campaign on August 29 described the interactions between the two:

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Kevin Drum Wants You for the Bailout, But Consider This First

| Tue Sep. 30, 2008 12:01 PM EDT

Kevin urges readers to call members of Congress and tell them to vote for the $700 billion bailout bill. In an earlier posting, he explained why he favors the plan. But before readers pick up the phone, they might want to read what Mother Jones contributor Nomi Prims says about the bailout. Or what Mother Jones contributor James Galbraith has to say. Or what economist Dean Baker has to say.

Baker notes,

Almost every economist I know rejects the Paulson approach and argues instead for directly injecting capital into the banks. The taxpayers give them the money and then we own some, or all, of the bank. (That's what Warren Buffet did with Goldman Sachs.)
This isn't about begging for a sliver of equity as a concession for a $700 billion bailout, this is about constructing a bank rescue the way that business people would do it. We have an interest in a well-operating financial system. There is zero public interest in giving away taxpayer dollars to the Wall Street banks and their executives.
If Secretary Paulson constructed a package that was centered around buying direct equity stakes in the banks, he could quickly garner large majority support in both houses. Better yet, Congress could just construct its own package centered on buying equity stakes and send it to President Bush. If he balks, we can just threaten him with stories about the Great Depression.

After $700 Billion Bailout Collapses in the House, GOP Mounts an Absurd Blame Game

| Mon Sep. 29, 2008 3:08 PM EDT

It took only a few minutes for the blame game to begin. Moments after the House failed to pass the $700 billion bailout plan, the Republican leaders--who could not produce the expected number of Republican votes for the legislation--came before the cameras with an explanation for the bill's collapse: a speech Nancy Pelosi gave.

House minority leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) told reporters that prior to the 228-to-205 vote everything was hunky-dory. Then the House Speaker delivered a "partisan speech" before the floor vote began. This, Boehner said, "poisoned our conference and caused a number of members we thought we could get to go south." Representative Eric Cantor, a member of the Republican leadership, held up a transcript of Pelosi's speech and decried her "failure to lead."

What did Pelosi say that was so heinous? Here are some portions from the text that was issued by her office:

McCain the Patriot: "Country First or Obama First"

| Mon Sep. 29, 2008 12:46 PM EDT

John McCain put the choice rather directly during a campaign rally on Monday afternoon when he declared, "Country first or Obama first." In other words, there is only one way a true patriot can vote--and Obama does not love his country as much as McCain does. Anyone care to argue that such an argument is not a scoundrel's refuge?

The First Obama-McCain Debate: Not as Telling as Real Life

| Sat Sep. 27, 2008 12:25 AM EDT

No memorable exchanges. No historic zingers. No gotchas. The much-anticipated first face-off between Barack Obama and John McCain resolved little. Neither candidate strayed from their usual briefing books. The talking points were recycled. McCain blasted Obama for being a rookie in the ways of national security. Obama questioned McCain's judgment, notably his initial support for the Iraq war.

They both played it safe. Especially when it came to the hot topic of the night: the $700 billion bailout plan for Wall Street. It was no surprise that moderator Jim Lehrer would lead off with the issue, even though the focus of this debate was supposed to be foreign policy. And in his first question, Lehrer asked each candidate to state where he stands on the "financial recovery plan." Neither would get specific. Obama cited the need to move "swiftly" and "wisely." He called for effective oversight of the plan, taxpayer protections, and guarantees the money spent would not reach the pockets of CEOs. He pointed to the current meltdown as evidence of the failure of economic policies supported these past eight years by George W. Bush and McCain. It was standard fare.

McCain noted he was heartened by the bipartisan negotiations under way in Washington. He, too, cited the need for accountability. He mentioned the possibility of adding a provision to the package that would allow the federal government to offer loans to troubled institutions rather than buy their bad paper. Neither one, though, fully endorsed the plan--or raised any objections. Asked if he would vote for it, McCain said, "I hope so." It was a strong signal he would not be mounting any from-the-right populist crusade against the proposal.

But each candidate exploited the bailout queries. Obama tried to tie McCain to Bushonomics. McCain hailed his own efforts to curtail pork-barrel spending on Capitol Hill. Obama slapped him for focusing on $18 billion in earmarks while supporting $300 billion in tax breaks for corporations and wealthy individuals. McCain accused Obama of being a tax-hiker. Obama countered--correctly--that his tax plan provides far more relief for taxpayers making less than $250,000 a year than does McCain's proposal.

It was as if they were eager to talk about any economic issue other than the details of a gargantuan bailout that may or may not work and that may or may not be popular come Election Day.

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