Kiera Butler

Kiera Butler

Senior Editor

A senior editor at Mother Jones, Kiera covers health, food, and the environment. She is the author of the new book Raise: What 4-H Teaches 7 Million Kids—and How Its Lessons Could Change Food and Farming Forever (University of California Press).

 

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Eco-News Roundup: Friday, July 17

Here's today's mix of science, environment, and health stories (ok, mostly health today) from our other blogs. And if you haven't read Josh Harkinson's piece about pot farms in our national parks, well, it's a trip. (Sorry, couldn't resist.)

Doctors without orders: The CIA is hiring doctors. Shudder.

Dream a little dream: Brad Delong's flights of health-care-reform fancy.

Climate change policy for the rest of us: How do you convince an ordinary schmoe that higher energy prices are worth paying?

Rationing rationale: Guess what? Health care is already rationed. Now, says Peter Singer, let's make it fair.

AMA, oh my: The American Medical Association endorses a pretty good health care reform plan. What a nice surprise.

Buying Green: Bad for Your Credit?

Till today, I couldn't find too many reasons not to shop at the Salvation Army: Thrift-stores are cheaper, better for the planet, and usually more interesting than the mall. But turns out my fondness for weird old mugs could land me in financial hot water. Treehugger has a great little post today about green consumer habits that some credit companies consider "red flags:"

Credit companies take note, for instance, if you charge services like tire retreading and shoe repair to your card. Or if you're shopping at thrift stores like the Salvation Army.

The message: Buying used things and repairing broken ones instead of buying new means you're struggling financially, and can't be trusted to pay back a loan. That's awfully backwards. Little do the credit companies know how much poorer I'd be if I didn't shop at the Salvation Army.

For other credit company red flags, check out this Concord Monitor piece.

Eco-News Roundup: Tuesday, July 14

Tuesday news of the Blue Marble variety, from around our site:

Trip down memory lane: Or lack thereof. Check out our drug-war timeline.

Is there a computer in the house? Sure, digitizing medical records will make doctors' jobs a lot easier. But is the Obama administration doing it all wrong?

Cheese, please: Domino's Pizza's new sidewalk ad campaign: Green or grotesque?

Boringest babysitter ever: GOP House reps say never mind a bill that would support new parents, why not just park the kids in front of a Baby Einstein DVD?

Doha drag: Likelihood of progress on agricultural issues in trade talks, given the reluctance of rich countries to reduce subsidies on farmed products? Not great, says Kevin Drum.

 

Domino's Dominates Sidewalks (With Pizza Ads)

In March, citizens of Louisville, Kentucky, experienced KFC-themed pothole repairs. Now, folks in New York City, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles can tread on sidewalks bearing ads for Domino's Pizza.

GreenGraffiti, the Netherlands-based company Domino's partnered with for the campaign, claims all kinds of green cred. Plus, its site says, it's doing the cities a service by washing the sidewalk (though the gross gum in the image shown here suggests that squeaky clean is not the goal, and not everyone is convinced ads are more attractive than dirt).

Good thing Domino's is targeting walkers, since the focus of the campaign, the American Legends Pizza, has 40 percent more cheese than a regular pizza.

Eco-News Roundup: Friday, July 10

Just in case you missed these health, environment, and science stories from our other blogs:

Torture couture: Class up your t-shirt collection with these fine garments.

Political science: What percentage of scientists identify as Republican? A new Pew survey has the un-shocking answer.

Dr. Evil: Who best to fix healthcare? Why a fraudulent former hospital exec, of course.

Six characters in search of the drug war: How backward policies and forward-thinking traffickers got us to this point.

Let the circle be broken: Carbon-related positive feedback loops caused a horrendous drought in the Amazon in 2005. Just another joy of climate change.

Worry while you work: Mandatory furloughs, wage freezes, and benefit cuts are just some of the recession-related bummers keeping American employees up at night.

Photo of the day: Iraqi soldiers learn to use a terrain board to plan missions.

 

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