Tasneem Raja, Interactive Editor

Tasneem Raja

Interactive Editor

Tasneem Raja is MoJo's Interactive Editor. She specializes in web app production, interactive graphics, and user interface design. Before joining Mother Jones, she was an interactive producer at The Bay Citizen. Before crossing over to the dark side, she was a features reporter and copyeditor at The Chicago Reader.

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Income Inequality Takes Manhattan—in 3-D!

| Wed Aug. 28, 2013 5:00 AM EDT

It's no surprise that income inequality in America is on the rise. Eighty percent of Americans have seen their incomes stagnate or fall since 1979. Meanwhile, the top 1 percent of earners is taking in more than ever before. We've made numerous charts to illustrate these disparities. But what if you could actually see the split between the superwealthy and everyone else?

Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm's images of income in New York do just that. Using 2012 data from the mapping site ArcGIS, Lamm superimposed 3-D bars over photos of the cityscape to show the median net worth of census block groups. For example, "if one section had a net worth of $500,000, the height of the 3-D bar shape for that section was 5 cm. If one section had a net worth of $112,000, the height for that section was 1.12 cm." The resulting images clearly illustrate New York's status as one of the cities with the highest levels of income inequality.

Below, you can interact with the cityscape and the 3-D images for various neighborhoods.

Central Park. The Upper West Side is on the left.

 

The Financial District and the southern tip of Manhattan. (Note: Statue of Liberty has been added.)

 

Harlem

 

Looking south over Manhattan from Englewood, New Jersey. Washington Heights is on the left. Central Park and Midtown are in the distance.

 

Midtown near the Trump Tower.

 

Above Brooklyn. The Financial District is on the left. Midtown is on the right.

 

Looking south toward the Upper West Side.

 

Above Central Park. The Upper East Side is on the left.

 

Above Yankee Stadium in the Bronx.

NSA Mad Libs: Choose Your Own [Redacted]

| Thu Aug. 22, 2013 5:00 AM EDT

On Wednesday, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a 2011 FISA Court ruling striking down a top-secret National Security Agency online-surveillance program. The court, whose opinions are normally classified, found that the agency had accessed as many as 56,000 electronic communications (such as emails) from American citizens and foreign nationals over a three-year period by tapping into fiber-optic cables.

The ruling is 86 pages long, but don't expect to read all of it: It's so heavily redacted that large portions of the text look like some sort of cubist Rorschach test. As a result, much of the declassified ruling's contents will still be unknown to the general public.

But don't let that stop you! Below, you can take your best guess at what the redacted opinions should say with our NSA Choose-Your-Own-[Redacted] Mad Libs:

Think the results of your NSA Mad Lib looked crazy? Check out some of the actual redactions on the newly released FISA rulings:

Page 1
The black marker was definitely working on page 1. Behold, a nearly perfect square, redacting the entire opening paragraph.

 

Page 4
Page 4 informs us that something is limited to the "the targeting of non-United States persons reasonably believed to be located outside the United States." And that's about it.

 

Page 12
Hoping to find the bibliography information for citation No. 11 on page 12? Fuhgeddaboudit.

 

Page 27
Page 27 might not tell you much about the new provision, but this redaction does kind of resemble an American flag. So at least it's patriotic.

 

Page 58
It appears one lucky word on page 58 was not redacted for a brief, shining moment. But eventually, the black marker won. What do you think that word was? Leave your comments below.

Bachmann's Right: The Founders Would "Hardly Even Recognize" America Today

| Wed May 29, 2013 5:45 PM EDT

Michele Bachmann has said some crazy things over the years. When her goodbye speech today warned that America is "becoming a nation our founders would hardly even recognize today," we had to agree.

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