Pioneering Stem Cell Surgery Replaces Woman’s Windpipe


Ah, the wonders of science. Check out this story from the NY Times.

A Spanish woman was hospitalized in March with a windpipe so badly damaged by tuberculosis that she was unable to breathe after walking more than a few steps at a time. The only conventional treatment that doctors saw was the removal of her left lung, a dangerous procedure with a high mortality rate.

Instead, a coalition of doctors and scientists from three European countries decided to try a ground-breaking stem cell procedure. They took a three-inch segment of trachea from an organ donor who had died of a cerebral hemorrhage. Over a six-week period, the trachea was stripped of donor cells, which were replaced by stem cells taken from the Spanish woman’s bone marrow. After just four days of “seeding” the trachea with these cells, the trachea was used to replace the woman’s damaged wind pipe.

Two months after the surgery, tests shows that the woman’s lungs and wind pipe are functioning like normal. Her body has not rejected the new organ or reacted negatively in any way.

What’s great about the procedure is that it was done using the patient’s own stem cells, not embryonic stem cells. Thus, it skirts the controversies about life that commonly surround stem cell work in the United States. With President-elect Obama poised to eliminate many Bush Administration restrictions on stem cell research, pioneering procedures like this one may soon happen in America, and we will all live to be 150.

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