9/11 Mastermind Goes on Trial in France


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Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the alleged “kingpin” of the 9/11 attacks, was captured in Pakistan in March 2003. He then disappeared in the global network of “black sites” operated by the CIA before resurfacing in Guantanamo in September 2006. The US military plans to try him for the deaths of over 3,000 Americans by means of a military commission. Human rights groups argue that such a trial would lack legal safeguards necessary to guarantee a fair trial, and are therefore urging that the US government try Mohammed either in civilian court or by a standard military court martial.

The battle over Mohammed’s legal fate continues, but we may see him tried (and presumably convicted) well before any US action takes place. The BBC reports that a trial opened today in France, accusing Mohammed and several co-conspirators of planning the April 2002 truck bombing of a Tunisian synagogue, which killed 21 people. Two of the victims were French nationals, a fact that has enabled French prosecutors to try the case.

From the BBC:

According to court documents, suicide bomber Nizar Nouar called Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and Mr Ganczarski, a convert to Islam who specialised in communications, just before he drove the gas-laden truck into the synagogue.

The calls were allegedly made on a telephone brought into Tunisia by the bomber’s brother, the third defendant Walid Nouar.

All three men have been charged with “complicity in attempted murder in relation to a terrorist enterprise”. They face 20 years in prison if convicted.

Relatives of the victims were in court on Monday.

“We are hoping for a life sentence… and we think there is sufficient evidence,” said Judith-Adam Caumeil, a lawyer for German families.

Christian Ganczarski, a Polish-born German, identified himself to the court in German and insisted on his innocence.

“I had nothing to do with the attack,” he said.

The bomber’s uncle, Belgacem Nouar, was jailed in 2006 for his role in the attacks.

The trial is due to last until 6 February.

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