Visitors to California Prisons, Beware


I just addressed my very first letter with the words “VISITING APPLICATION ENCLOSED” on the envelope; I’m trying to meet with a source currently residing in a California prison.

If you’ve never filled one of these applications out, the front is pretty much what you’d expect—name, Social Security number, do you have a criminal record? But I learned some interesting stuff on the back. Like, for example, that I lose the right to leave without being searched in the event that a “cause for a search arises while the visitor is one the institution grounds.” Also, giving letters to or taking letters from inmates is a misdemeanor. Ditto for gifts. But my favorite clause is the last one. “Hostages will not be recognized for bargaining purposes during attempted escapes by inmates.” First of all, I wonder if, when it comes down to it, that’s really true. Second: Does this mean that by signing that I understand this condition, I can’t sue the state of California for not trying to save me if I become a hostage in an attempted escape?

 

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