Dershowitz Just Tried To Clarify His Bonkers Statement. His Explanation Was Equally Insane.

Like many people who randomly challenge people to debate them, the president’s attorney Alan Dershowitz is now yelling that he didn’t say something that he did say.

Dershowitz said on the Senate floor on Wednesday that it is not corrupt or impeachable for a president to commit a quid pro quo if he’s doing it to get reelected and it’s in the interest of the public. You might remember it because it was a bonkers thing to say:

The implication is that it’s in the national interest for the president to be reelected. And so they can do whatever they want to make that happen. It was widely reported, by places like the Associated Press.

Today, Dershowitz went on CNN to say that he didn’t say that. (He wrote an op-ed for the Hill to say he didn’t say it too.) And he asked Wolf Blitzer to stop saying he said it, that it was a lie.

Reader, watch the clip yourself and see if you agree. 

Dershowitz also defended his statements by saying they were entirely theoretical. “I deliberately did not talk about the facts,” he said, when discussing Trump’s motives.

Dershowitz was absent from the impeachment trial today, and the CNN interview cleared up why: He didn’t want to skip his ticket to the Super Bowl on Sunday. He also called himself  a “liberal Democrat.”

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