Cap and Trade in the Dark?


Here’s some disturbing info on the climate change bill moving through Congress. From a press release put out by the Sunlight Foundation:

Washington, DC – This Friday, Congress plans to vote on a bill that could fundamentally alter the American economy, dramatically affect the climate, and have huge implications for our national security. But, right now no one knows what’s in the bill or how it came to be.

Last week, the American Clean Energy and Security Act (the “Cap and Trade Energy Bill”), or H.R. 2454, was 946 pages long. Over the weekend, it ballooned to 1,201 pages with no explanation for how or why. It is currently only available online at the House Rules Committee, and is reported as “text of the bill to be introduced.” This legislative maneuvering reminds us of the failure of Congress to make bills properly available before consideration.

In a statement today, Sunlight Foundation Engagement Director Jake Brewer said, “The fastest speed-readers and the most intelligent minds can’t make informed decisions with that much time. How can Congress?” He continued, “The problem here is the bill wasn’t developed in the open in a committee, so no one–including those members of Congress not on the Energy Committee-knows how this latest version was created.”

It’s very likely that even many of those advocating for or against this legislation won’t know what was inserted or what the final bill will be, since changes will be accepted right up until 9:30am on Thursday morning before an intended vote on Friday….

Without proper public and journalistic oversight, it may be too late for the cap and trade energy bill. It will likely become another case study in Sunlight’s hall of shamefully rushed bills.

Earlier today, I noted that Reps. Henry Waxman and Ed Markey, the two lead authors of the bill, are honorable legislators and passionate about redressing the negative consequences of climate change. Still, folks on and off the Hill ought to know–and understand–what’s in the bill before it reaches a vote.

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