Sam Myers, the Late Blues God, Propels Us Into the Week With a Powerful New Album

The pioneering blues singer, harmonica player, and drummer Sam Myers

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When he was 7, Sam Myers was left blind by cataracts, which shaped his childhood and adulthood but never affected his solo tours and ascension of the blues world as a pioneering singer, harmonica player, and drummer from Mississippi. He became, before he died at the age of 70, one of the most decorated blues giants, jamming with Elmore James in the 1950s and with Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, and Little Walter.

Today marks the release, after decades of recording at bars, restaurants, and clubs, of a long-anticipated album, Sam Myers & the South Dallas Shoan-Nufferz: My Pal Sam. It’s a studio compilation of never-before-heard tracks, produced by Jack Chaplin, the versatile chef and blues champion who’s familiar to Recharge readers. The album is available through his Patreon page.

Chaplin is credited with getting Myers into the studio again and into Chaplin’s restaurants in Dallas and New London, Connecticut, along with the blues giant Lucky Peterson. Chaplin himself has helped to keep the blues at bay, cooking for families and community members in need during the pandemic, with all the kindness and creativity found in his series Cooking With the Blues.

There’s plenty of blues coming in the news ahead, little of it welcome. Here’s some blues and strength to meet it with. Share your Myers and Chaplin stories at recharge@motherjones.com.

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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