Sam Myers, the Late Blues God, Propels Us Into the Week With a Powerful New Album

The pioneering blues singer, harmonica player, and drummer Sam Myers

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When he was 7, Sam Myers’ eyesight was limited by cataracts that shaped his childhood and adulthood but never limited his music tours and ascension in the blues world—as a pioneering singer, harmonica player, and drummer. He became one of the most decorated and vibrant blues giants, jamming with Elmore James in the 1950s and Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, and Little Walter.

In his 70 years, Myers spent two decades recording at bars, restaurants, and clubs in creative friendship with, among many supporters, the chef and producer Jack Chaplin, who’s familiar to Recharge readers as the versatile, acclaimed host of Daddy Jack’s Cooking With the Blues. The long-anticipated album, Sam Myers & the South Dallas Shoan-Nufferz: My Pal Sam, is a thrill of uptempo jams—a studio compilation of never-before-heard tracks available through Chaplin’s Patreon page

Chaplin deserves a ton of credit for getting Myers into the studio again and into Chaplin’s spaces—in Dallas and now New London, Connecticut—along with the blues great Lucky Peterson. Chaplin has helped to keep the blues at bay by cooking for families and community members during the pandemic, with all the creative tips we’ve come to enjoy from his personalized channel Cooking With the Blues.

There’s a lot of blues coming in the news ahead; here’s some strength to meet it with. Share your Myers and Chaplin shoutouts at recharge@motherjones.com, and get with Chaplin’s Patreon if you haven’t yet.

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