Erika Eichelberger

Erika Eichelberger

Reporter

Erika Eichelberger is a reporter in Mother Jones' Washington bureau. She has also written for The NationThe Brooklyn Rail, and TomDispatch. Email her at eeichelberger [at] motherjones [dot] com. 

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Economy Adds 74,000 Jobs—Economists Predicted 200,000-Plus

| Fri Jan. 10, 2014 10:47 AM EST

The economy added just 74,000 jobs in December, which was fewer than expected, according to new numbers released by the Labor Department on Friday. The unemployment rate dropped to 6.7 percent. But as has been the case in previous months, this drop is due largely to the fact that many Americans left the labor force, and thus were not officially counted as unemployed by the government.

The number of jobs added in December was the smallest monthly gain in three years. Gains of over 200,000 jobs had been expected.

The unemployment rate for adult men and whites declined last month to 6.3 percent and 5.9 percent, respectively. Meanwhile, the jobless rate for blacks and Hispanics remained disproportionately high at 11.9 percent and 8.3 percent. The unemployment rate for Asians remained at 4 percent. The rate for women held at 6 percent. 

In December (as in November), 7.8 million Americans were employed in part-time work because they could not find full-time jobs.

As in previous months, employment increased in low-wage service jobs. Jobs in retail, including in restaurants, bars, and clothing stores, rose by 55,000 in December. Temp work gained 40,000 jobs. 

Manufacturing added 9,000 jobs. Employment numbers in the healthcare industry held steady.

The number of long-term unemployed—those without a job for 27 weeks or more—remained at a whopping 37.7 percent of the unemployed last month. Federal unemployment benefits for the long-term jobless expired at the end of the year. The Senate recently voted to consider a bill renewing these benefits, but it is unclear if Republicans in the Senate and House will approve a final bill.

If Congress does not renew the benefits, we may see an even greater shrinkage in the labor force, as the long-term unemployed, who are some of the least employable Americans, no longer have the means to continue searching for jobs.

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Marco Rubio to Jobless: Get Out Of Town

| Thu Jan. 9, 2014 8:05 AM EST

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida).

Among the more intriguing proposals in Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Florida)'s War on Poverty anniversary speech Wednesday was giving jobless people subsidies to move to low-unemployment areas. Sounds like a common-sense fix? Maybe—but Mike Konczal, a expert in unemployment and inequality at the Roosevelt Institute, says it would just move the problem around.

Here's why. Even though some states and localities have sunnier employment rates than others, Konczal tells Mother Jones, that doesn't mean there are more jobs available in those places. "States with low unemployment are often small states that are heavily agricultural," he says. "There is not a lot of dynamic turnover… There are already unemployed people there who want those jobs" that are open. Konczal had a deeper analysis of this type of proposal on the Washington Post's Wonkblog last August, noting that such relocation vouchers would also likely go to"people who are at the back of the job queue—long-term unemployed with low savings. These are populations that will have trouble finding work, and so it is likely that they’d just move to be at the end of the queue of another state."

Kevin Drum has more on Rubio's other proposals, including a government wage subsidy.

Here Are the Chris Christie Emails Everyone Is Talking About

| Wed Jan. 8, 2014 12:01 PM EST

On Wednesday, news outlets released emails indicating that top aides to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie blocked lanes on a major bridge last year in retaliation against a political opponent.

Last September, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey abruptly closed two lanes on the George Washington Bridge, causing a massive traffic jam that clogged the streets of Fort Lee, N.J. News outlets and New Jersey Democrats began to look into the circumstances surrounding the bridge closure, suspecting that the Port Authority closed the bridge lanes in an act of political retaliation against Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich, a Democrat who backed Gov. Chris Christie's opponent in the 2013 gubernatorial campaign. The emails released today suggest that was indeed the case:

 
Mon Nov. 17, 2014 5:22 PM EST
Thu Nov. 6, 2014 3:12 PM EST
Fri Oct. 17, 2014 11:24 AM EDT
Thu Oct. 16, 2014 9:39 AM EDT
Thu Jul. 31, 2014 7:06 PM EDT
Fri Jul. 18, 2014 11:32 AM EDT
Thu Jul. 3, 2014 10:18 AM EDT
Thu May. 15, 2014 9:58 AM EDT
Fri May. 9, 2014 11:59 AM EDT
Fri Apr. 4, 2014 11:04 AM EDT
Fri Feb. 7, 2014 12:05 PM EST
Thu Feb. 6, 2014 6:00 AM EST