Sam Baldwin

Sam Baldwin

Online Editor

Sam Baldwin is the Online Editor at Mother Jones. Before joining MoJo, Sam worked on the finance team for the 2008 Obama campaign. A proud Chicagoan, Sam loves flat-water canoeing, home-brewed beer, and consistently winning his fantasy football league. He is a graduate of Pomona College and lives in Oakland.

Get my RSS |

Video: Reporter Emilio Gutiérrez Soto Speaks

| Tue Jul. 7, 2009 3:22 PM EDT

Emilio Gutiérrez Soto, the persecuted Mexican journalist who is Chuck Bowden's subject in the current issue of Mother Jones, recently spoke with the press freedom group Reporters Without Borders. Emilio was detained for 7 months by the ICE after he arrived at the border seeking asylum last June. He is now staying with friends in Las Cruces, still waiting for both a temporary work permit and his asylum trial.

Advertise on MotherJones.com

Even These Guys Want to Legalize It!

| Mon Jul. 6, 2009 2:32 PM EDT

In Kevin Drum's excellent "Patriot's Guide to Legalization" he estimates that "Ten years from now, as the flower power generation enters its 70s, you might finally be able to smoke a fully legal, taxed, and regulated joint."

10 years!?!? That's way too long! Too long for Emilio Gutiérrez Soto, our national forests, the overcrowded prison system, the southern border, 259 US cities, and the entire country of Mexico.

Who, exactly, are the forces aligned against the decriminalization of marijuana? Who makes it politically untenable for politicians to sign on to bills like the one California Assemblyman Tom Ammiano has introduced? Somewhat surprisingly, it isn't the intellectual right. On the most recent episode of the McLaughlin Group, conservatives Rich Lowry and Monica Crowley agreed with their more liberal co-panelists in coming out for the decriminalization of marijuana. At one point during the discourse John McLaughlin rattles off a long list of prominent conservative and mainstream intellectuals—William Buckley, George Schultz, Milton Friedman, Walter Cronkite—all of whom supported decriminalization. Sure, Monica Crowley stills mouths off some BS about how pot is a gateway drug, but that's more than made up for when Lowry recalls a colleague of his for whom cannabis provided the only relief from chemo. This all comes in the wake of the Cato Institute's publication of Glenn Greenwald's report on the success of drug decriminalization in Portugal.

Watch the McLaughlin Group duke it out, and by duke it out I mean totally agree with each other, after the jump.

The Internet Can Boil Pasta and Heat My Home Too!

| Thu Jun. 25, 2009 5:22 PM EDT

Last November, in our "Top 20 Econudrums," we asked whether it was more environmentally friendly to read the paper in print or online. It's a question with a surprising answer: As it turns out, it's often greener to read dead trees. This is true largely because of the giant environmental impact of servers. But thanks to some techies in Zurich, that could change soon.

Here's a little background: Server farms—also known as data centers—are the enormous housing facilities that make the internet possible. A single Google data center, in Oregon consumes as much energy as a city of 200,000. That's because servers not only have to be on 24/7, they need to be kept cool 24/7.  Up to 50 percent of the power they use is just to keep them from melting down.  Overall, the internet is responsible for 2% of global carbon emissions, about the same as the aviation industry.  And as the internet becomes increasingly prevalent in China and India, well, that means a whole lot more Xiaonei pages and Orkut accounts that will need hosting.

So it is good news, nay, great news, that the IBM lab in Zurich has developed a new cooling technology by attaching teeny-weeny water pipes to the surface of each computer chip in a server. Water is piped within microns of the chip to cool it down, then the waste water is piped out hot enough to make a cup of Ramen, heat a building, or keep a swimming pool warm. The new cooling system will reduce the carbon footprint of servers by 85 percent and the energy use by 40 percent. If this technology were in MoJo's office we could ditch the electric tea kettle and just go to the server closet to steep our chai. Check out a video of the technology after the break.

Even With Steroids, Trading Sammy Sosa Was a Dumb Move by Bush

| Thu Jun. 18, 2009 6:00 AM EDT

The exposé of Sammy Sosa's past steroid use hasn't surprised much of anybody. I lived a few blocks from Wrigley in Chicago during the magical 1998 season and even as a middle schooler I could sense that something was amiss. After Big Mac, BALCO, Clemens, congressional interventions, A-Rod, and Manny, fans and the sports press don't have the energy left to go through the outrage motions with Slammin' Sammy. In Robert Lipsyte's excellent overview of recent sports books he suggests that the sports media take a new approach towards the steroids story:

Meanwhile, it feels like the pin-striped suits are slinking away without the media-mauling they deserve, much less real punishment. Maybe this is the chance for the sports media to make a comeback, avenge the loss, win one when it counts. While it might be hard to mount a war crimes charge against George W. Bush, what about a steroids trial? After all, he was managing partner of the Texas Rangers in the early 1990s when Jose Conseco, the guru and snitch of performance enhancing drugs, played for him and began sharing his needle.

So, George, what did you know and when did you know it?

Funny that Lipsyte should mention Bush's former ownership of the Texas Rangers on the day the Sosa steroids news broke. During the 2000 Republican primaries the candidates were asked what they considered their biggest mistake and Bush somewhat famously answered that his had been to sign off on the 1989 trade of Sammy Sosa from the Texas Rangers to the Chicago White Sox. It was a dumb answer—he did, of course, have a DUI—but it was innocuous enough and may have endeared him to baseball-loving Americans. The 2000 elections, after all, fell right during the height of the Steroid Era; a time when balls were flying out of ballparks, and the game was enjoying an incredible surge in popularity. So while Bush's trade of Sosa looked particularly stupid in 2000, when Sammy was in the midst of a 4-year stretch where he hit an insane 243 homers, a decade of steroid scandals later (including Sammy's own day of reckoning) the trade doesn't look any better.

Why? Because, to owners throughout the majors, the Steroid Era was worth the largely player-focused ignominy that followed. The game enjoys a popularity and profitability today that it never would have without the enhanced exploits of Sammy and Mark McGwire in 1998, Barry Bonds to follow, and so on.

This is precisely Lipsyte's point: owners haven't suffered any consequences for their role in the Steroid Era (other than temporarily losing the services of players suspended for juicing). Steroid use is a stain that falls solely on the players (even as they feel the physical after-effects on their bodies), while the real moneyed interests continue to get off scot-free. 

Wed Apr. 17, 2013 10:01 PM EDT
Sat May. 12, 2012 3:05 AM EDT
Mon Sep. 6, 2010 3:39 AM EDT
Thu May. 20, 2010 3:40 PM EDT
Wed Dec. 30, 2009 2:51 PM EST
Fri Oct. 9, 2009 1:26 PM EDT
Thu Sep. 24, 2009 5:27 PM EDT
Tue Sep. 8, 2009 1:19 PM EDT
Fri Aug. 21, 2009 9:11 PM EDT
Wed Aug. 5, 2009 7:20 PM EDT
Wed Jul. 29, 2009 3:44 PM EDT
Mon Jul. 13, 2009 1:35 PM EDT
Tue Jul. 7, 2009 3:22 PM EDT
Mon Jul. 6, 2009 2:32 PM EDT
Sun Apr. 5, 2009 12:14 PM EDT
Thu Mar. 26, 2009 2:17 PM EDT